Every time I see a patent hobo that’s supposed to slouch a bit in order to be wearable, I die a little bit inside. Why do designers keep doing this to us? Patent doesn’t slouch. That’s one of it’s innate qualities – it’s a structured, polished material for structured, polished bags.

I really like the maybe-tacky (shut up, I like tacky) effect of the burgundy zebra print on the Jimmy Choo Zebra Patent Hobo, but I can’t help but imagine that the stiff-looking handle would probably perch itself on my shoulder instead of molding to my arm, just like the body of the bag below it.

One of the last Oscar de la Renta handbags we covered on PurseBlog (other than fashion show recaps) was in 2008. In the world of fashion, and everyday world, that is a long time ago. Apologies to all of you for leaving Oscar de la Renta off our site and apologies to Oscar himself, because we love you! Now it is time for a re-introduction to Oscar de la Renta bags and it is coming at just the perfect time.

It’s funny how six months to get used to the idea of a handbag changes things. When I first saw the fringed bags in the Marc Jacobs Spring 2010 runway show, I was a little unsure. Given more time acquaint myself with the design, however, I sort of love the bags. I’m not sure if it’s because I’ve merely become resigned to their existence or because I have actual affection for them, but I’m going to go with the latter.

Hey MCM, Donna Karan called. She wants her bag back.

I’m a firm believer that there is nothing really new under the sun, and that well-worn Biblical adage is doubly true when applied to the fashion world. Everything is recycled, reinterpreted, or deconstructed, if not outright ripped off. The best designers manage to borrow from the past and create something new and interesting from their influences.

I’m too young to remember when MCM was a big deal the first time around, but I have been assured that it was and I have no reason not to believe it. I’ve seen those bags, though, and I have a hard time imagining them being widely popular, but, you know, the 80s were a weird time.

I’m thankful that their logo bags haven’t returned in the 80s nostalgia wave (a wave that I’m ok with, in general – I just bought another pair of Ray-Ban Wayfarers, after all), but if they keep making bags like the MCM North/South Leather Hobo, I wouldn’t mind at all if the brand became a trend all over again.

I’ve heard that turquoise is the color of spring this year. Ok, well, I heard it from something that Megs said on Twitter, so maybe I can’t claim any original research in the “color of the season” category, but turquoise sounds just about as likely as anything else. I have seen a lot of hot pink bags for spring, though, so I’d like to nominate that for second place.

So this week (and in particular, this weekend) are all about red, right? Well, according to the people that have a vested interest in selling you (or, perhaps more accurately, your significant other) lots and lots of Valentine’s Day swag, anyway. We’ll have more on V-Day throughout the week, but for a moment, I’d like to celebrate something that’s red that has blissfully little to do with anything other than good taste: the Valentino Premier Bow Hobo.

Get ready to be surprised and astounded, you guys: I’ve found a Valentino bag about which I am totally and utterly ambivalent. I know this doesn’t happen often, so if you feel like you need to take a moment to let that sink in, please go ahead and take one. We’ll wait.

You back? Great.

In fact, I’m having trouble rustling up any thoughts about it at all.

When I first saw the Gucci G Coin Medium Hobo, I couldn’t help but think that the whole thing seemed kind of sedate for the Gucci aesthetic. I know that the brand has plenty of simple, clean-lined bags at a variety of price points, but whenever I see one of them, it just seems like they’re missing the point of being Gucci, for cryin’ out loud.

Salvatore Ferragamo Miss Vera Denise Python Hobo

Exotic bags are always a hot topic of discussion, both around here and on our Forum. Some people love them, some people hate them, and others sit in the middle, fretting about their ethical implications without being able to completely convince themselves to dislike the bags. I was a member of the last group for a long time, but I finally came to a decision about it a while back: as long as the bag uses the skin to its fullest effect, I have no quarrel with it.

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