Emily: “How… Are you wearing the Ch…”

Andrea: “Chanel Boots? Yeah, I am.”

One of the most in-your-face quotes, that iconic The Devil Wears Prada phrase is one that nearly every fashionista has memorized by heart, and for good reason. The ultimate Cinderella moment. The sweetest revenge. The boldest look. The house and name of Chanel is synonymous with all of that and more, and this particular scene from The Devil Wears Prada is a culmination of all three.

image via Elle

Chanel’s success hasn’t been limited to clothing and perfumes only, though in the 60s when fast fashion was fast replacing traditional haute couture, Chanel is said to have survived solely on the success of its No. 5 perfume. Chanel has been a trailblazer in bag-making as well, creating the classic diamond-stitched quilting which was inspired by jackets worn by men at the races at the time. That iconic quilting has since been copied countless times by well-known and unknown brands alike.

Coco Chanel herself famously devised a special order bag from Louis Vuitton that has evolved into the uber-popular Alma bag we know and love it today. I daresay (is “daresay” still a thing? I suddenly feel so archaic, but I digress) the pillow bag trend that’s become so ubiquitous recently was actually popularized by the Chanel 19. Although it arguably was Bottega Veneta that catapulted the trend to modern day popularity, with earlier roots dating to Celine’s pillow bags, whose puffy-framed clutches were identical to shapes seen in the 70s.

Despite all this kerfuffle regarding Chanel, it’s not a brand I can wrap my head around. Sure, there is a lot of speculation regarding whether the quilts have now become dated, and of course there’s the constant outrage regarding price increases, but what really bugs me about Chanel is its vision of its consumers.

I think every brand has a certain identity associated with it, its DNA, or maybe its definition of the “[insert brand name] woman”. Whether it’s la femme Dior (in my mind that’s always going to be Lady Diana), la donna (or devil) di Prada or even Balenciaga’s Kate Moss, every brand has a vision (or delusion of grandeur) of its ideal shopper.

But Chanel, while literally in a league of its own (price-wise), seems to be fidgety regarding its definition of the “Chanel girl/lady/woman/possibly Pharell Williams”. It’s sort of like Bottega Veneta, except so much broader because with BV you can at least discern a pre-Daniel Lee and post-Daniel Lee fan of the brand. With Chanel however, there are SO many different bags to choose from, and I sometimes wish there was a guide to discontinued Chanel bags (as much as I’d love to make one, just thinking about it is giving me the chills).

Chanel is a staple in every celebrity wardrobe ever, but you also come across them frequently enough to question whether they’re really as exclusive as they’re made out to be. While the same can be said about Louis Vuitton, at least its bags bear some resemblances, generally in the form of the monogrammed canvas/damier prints. Chanel’s offerings, on the other hand, are just so diverse, the classic flaps and GSTs are merely the tip of the iceberg. Did you know there was a Chanel purse called the Natural Beauty tote? Or a Chanel Kelly? Nope? Me neither.

But truth be told, I really love Chanel’s extensive collection of obscure totes and bowling bags. In fact, here are a few I picked out from just for you:

Chanel Caviar Quilted Small Business Affinity Shopping Bag ($3,910)

For the chic businesswoman who’s in charge and organized.

Chanel Caviar Quilted Timeless CC Soft Tote ($1,745)

Perfect for stylish moms and (teenage) daughters alike!

Chanel Calfskin Quilted Large Chesterfield Tote ($2,365)

Bubbly, flabby, roomy, very open and in line with the pillow trend but bigger. No, I’m not talking about myself, thank you very much.

Chanel Vinyl XL Lipstick Tote ($1,390)

When you love a giant bag but don’t want to look like a homeless person.

Chanel Aged Calfskin Quilted Express Bowling Bag ($3,595)

A trusted traveling companion that’s got a deceptively large capacity (I think) and is a great addition to your “airport look”.

Chanel Caviar Quilted Jumbo Kelly Flap ($3,495)

Elegant and graceful, trendy and timeless, Kelly but Chanel, this is for the woman whose only battle is with herself, and who wants to have it all.

It is often said that bags choose their owners, not the other way around, but while some purses clearly are picky and snobbish, Chanel seems a bit more meritocratic. Its intrigue lies in the fact that it’s omnipresent, yet enigmatic.

There’s so much more to Chanel than just the quilts and flaps, and perhaps all of the various types of women who carry Chanel are a culmination of Chanel’s ultimate personality, that of the modern woman. Though we may never know, that shouldn’t stop us from getting our hands on a Chanel Kelly. Or a GST. Or a Cerf…You get the point.

So which Chanel bag are you?

Editor’s Note: While this article’s intention is to share people’s love for the Chanel brand, we would be remiss not to acknowledge Coco Chanel’s history with the German Nazi Party. That includes her relationship with Abwehr officer Baron Hans Günther von Dincklage, her strategic use of “Aryanization” laws that forced Jewish people to give up their businesses, and her work in the early 1940s as a German spy. Coco Chanel’s actions are inexcusable and something that all purse lovers should be aware of.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

86 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Heather
Heather
1 year ago

Not sure about this article, especially the quote, “When you love a giant bag but don’t want to look like a homeless person.”

indiewifey
indiewifey
1 year ago
Reply to  Heather

Fashion lovers have appropriated poverty for ages. I’ve always been fascinated by what seems to be a rather absolute silent acceptance of this incredibly ironic type of fashion statement, esp these days, given the (generally token, often tone deaf & inconsistent) virtue vetting that now goes on in both marketing & consumption, at all price/income levels
Appropriated poverty:
Let’s start with distressed destroyed jeans
Let’s look at raw seams and hems
Let’s look at baggy oversized garments, from pants belted at the knees to the latest high end dresses that look like baby doll balloons. Un-fitted invokes forced wear of hand me downs
Fascinating!

Kim
Kim
1 year ago
Reply to  indiewifey

I feel that one of the more egregious brands to glorify poverty are Golden Goose sneakers in the $500+ range. Initially, seeing this brand sickened me because they mock poverty while also capitalizing on it. Poor or indigent people have few options other than to purchase second hand “beat up” shoes. But to pay hundreds to look “poor” is not only flaunting wealth, but also consciously mocking the poor, which is despicable.

indiewifey
indiewifey
1 year ago
Reply to  Kim

So true! To buy their new is to appropriate buying (muddied stinky sweaty) old, used sneakers

Rita
Rita
1 year ago
Reply to  Heather

Thanks for posting this comment. I read the article, and it was beautifully written; however, when I came across that statement it made me cringe. I understand the overall meaning in reference to the Chanel bag that looked like a trash bag, but if I didn’t know the context behind that statement it would’ve caused a negative impression regarding purseblog and the values it carries. I have worked with homeless populations and having the stigma of looking “homeless” is far more demeaning, they have so many obstacles they face, and this statement felt like it furthered the stigmas they face.

Just a little food for thought.

Maya
Maya
11 months ago
Reply to  Rita

Agree 100 percent.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Rita

Kudos to you for your noble ventures, and sincerest apologies for the negative impression caused. I’m glad you pointed this out because it helps to further our sympathies for the less-privileged and hopefully reduce the stigma attached.

CL
CL
1 year ago
Reply to  Heather

I think he’s referencing the original homeless person trash bag from Chanel the coco cabas from almost 15 years ago. Everyone and their mother in NYC was carrying an oversized black trash liner like bag from Chanel. That plus dressing like the Olsen twins, you got it made.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  CL

And that plus the fact that when one carries an XL-sized bag around, one might run the risk of looking like their entire lives are in there, but the Chanel tote is dressy enough not to make that too apparent ?

Naomi
Naomi
1 year ago

Do I understand this quote correctly “Coco Chanel may have been a bold woman who was unafraid to break norms, but she was (and often is) also a shunned woman, accused of adultery, treachery and eccentricity. But after all, she’s only human, and like all people, there’s so much more to Chanel than just the quilts and flaps. So maybe we shouldn’t make judgements too soon”. What exactly are we “making judgements too soon” about? Opinions have been formed about her, based on her lifestyle choices, for years. She deceased in 1971 which was 50 years ago. Is that “too soon” to make judgements? Can you elucidate re: what exactly you meant by this quote?

Also, you state she “was and also IS a shunned woman”, but she’s deceased so how can she presently be a shunned woman”? What?

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Naomi

Wow, I really appreciate you copying and pasting that entire quote here, but I think what I mean via that statement is that we shouldn’t be making judgments about Ms. Chanel before we learn about her fully. She didn’t have an extremely pleasant childhood and it’s understandable that she was rebellious as a grown-up too. In fact, most of her life was a series of trial-and-errors, whether it’s her sometimes-odd choice of lovers or her possibly-questionable business decisions, and having had no one to guide her (though that allowed her to set trends that were unheard-of back then), she was a lonely visionary, which makes her flaws all the more apparent. In fact, I think a lot of what power-dressing means today can be attributed to Chanel.
But the judgments/criticisms against her and sometimes against the brand still continue, which is why I mentioned “IS a shunned woman”. I’m simply asking everyone to not typecast Chanel as just a “quilted flap bag brand”.

shopper
shopper
1 year ago

That outfit from the movie is awful. Pure fashion victim.

Passerine
Passerine
1 year ago
Reply to  shopper

To me the outfit is fine and very “of the moment” but the bag is hideous. Like a knitting class reject.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Passerine

Were crocheted bags ever really “in”? I wonder why so many brands continue to have some version of crochets till this date.

Kenzie
1 year ago

I believe they were “in” in the late 1960s to early 1970s with bohemians and earthy types. I have two slouchy crochet hobos from my grandmother. I believe they were made in Bolivia or Colombia….

This is a current day iteration: https://suryo.design/

They are bit of an acquired taste. I didn’t like them at first but they’ve grown on me- I think they are fun and funky!

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Kenzie

That’s great that you love crochets! Good to see someone who appreciates it.

TKS
TKS
1 year ago

Interesting thoughts, a couple of comments. First, participation in genocide, even indirectly, falls under something much more nefarious than the “just a fallible human” argument. Second, Coco Chanel is rather irrelevant in the modern day vision of Chanel. It’s Karl’s, and pretty much always has been, maybe always will be. You fail to even mention him here. When you say Chanel’s vision of their clientele – who do you mean? Not Coco Chanel, most certainly, so then….Karl? The Wertheimer’s? “Chanel” despises accessories customers. DESPISES. But will most certainly take their money. “They” only value RTW customers who spend the likes of 100k or more on non-accessories items in order to get any kind of status. You spend 100k on bags? Nope, you’re not worth sneezing at. They treat employees horribly, and are trying to sue anyone who resells (or consigns) their products (massive overreach IMHO). Everything is machine made now, including RTW, and much of what is produced is in shared factories that make items for brands such as Vince or JCrew.

So that’s how “Chanel” sees their clientele. How did Karl see Chanel’s clientele? Well, he was sexist, bigoted, size-ist, elitist, unapproachable, dictator-like and mean. Brilliant? Absolutely. Do I own an absolute truckload of Chanel? I sure do. Do I have cognitive dissonance? Positively. Reconciling spending so much money on a company rife with a*holes is a test of both rationalization and denial. So maybe the better question is, WHY do we buy it when that’s HOW they see us.

psny15
psny15
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

I agree with all your observations, for me Karl is Chanel and Chanel was Karl – I accept Karl with the good and bad but Hermès and Chanel treat their clients very poorly barring celebs and the ones who spend thousands on couture – I am no longer interested in buying from the store but will happily buy a preloved item if it is one I like and relatively adorable

Kamina
Kamina
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

‘Despises’ is a long stretch. The better word for it is ‘indifferent’. Saying RTW customers, as if RTW is what gets Chanel to value you is misleading. Chanel (corporate) wants well-rounded customers that purchase from every category (excl beauty), so fine jewelry, costume jewelry, rtw, shoes, bags, hats, etc. They want you to buy whole looks, HC, etc.

And before people drag Chanel, this sentiment isn’t exclusive to Chanel, it applies for all luxury brands, from Louis Vuitton to Prada. They want, prioritize, and ‘value’ customers that are loyal to the brand in all aspects.

They share factories with Gucci and Saint Laurent for RTW/Bags made in Italy, not Vince and J.Crew. lol. Yes, raw materials come from all over the world, from China, Vietnam, Indonesia, etc, but the majority of the work is done in Italy/France.

TKS
TKS
1 year ago
Reply to  Kamina

Despises is the right word. Sorry to upset you. I used that in lieu of “rodents”, which was the word shared to me by the uppers regarding accessories only customers. And yes, shared factories with Vince and JCrew, namely for production of shoes.

Kamina
Kamina
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

No one here is upset. I also have had conversations with many people who have worked at and with higher ups at Chanel. No one there cares enough to hate these people. They are just aware that accessories customers do not make the house money as much as customers that are well rounded, or those that purchase RTW, even if they made more profits per accessory.

Chanel gives these customers (‘RTW’ customers) special treatment because they are almost always loyal customers.

No, they don’t, especially for shoes. They work with three well-known shoe factories in Italy and a few smaller ones in Prato for cheaper, yet still well-made styles.

TKS
TKS
1 year ago
Reply to  Kamina

We can agree to disagree. And I am VIP at Chanel so I am not worried about how they treat me. I just don’t like that others are treated with such inequity despite their financial sacrifices being the same. RTW and high jewelry purchases are much higher commission for SA, and help them with quotas. Leather accessories, costume jewelry and shoes don’t count towards quotas for SA and only earn them about 1.5% commission. If they don’t meet their RTW quota they can be fired. That should explain their structure better for you to understand how they see accessories customers. Not as indifferent. As despised. Because those types of customers don’t help them with commission or quotas.

Jerri R
Jerri R
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

Not to mention, most of Chanel RTW are hideous and unflattering on most people I have seen. Sometimes it seems that they purchase and wear Chanel RTW just to show the world that they bought clothes from Chanel, especially with conspicuous logos. They looked silly to me rather than stylish. The entire Chanel RTW “thing” seems to have nothing to do with French chic — the sensible, effortless elegance.

Kamina
Kamina
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

I’m well aware of how they perceive accessories customers, indifferent.

A lower commission is placed on those categories because they practically sell themselves — literally continuing sell incredibly despite this forum’s complaints about quality issues, flagrant price hikes, and that resellers thread. It’s much harder to sell RTW and high jewelry, especially when people can justify a $32423 classic flap being versatile in heaps of occasions or an ‘investment’, while most of the RTW isn’t as versatile or able to sustain its value.

SAs are there for a check. If an SA despises customers that purchase only accessories, that’s their problem; that negative attitude certainly doesn’t reflect the attitudes of the higher-ups which is: they don’t care.

I was once a VIP at Chanel too, but my attention now goes to other houses as Virginie’s vision of Chanel isn’t exciting for me aside from like 1-2 pieces/looks.

We can end this conversation, I know it’s not going anywhere except arguing about ‘despised’ vs ‘indifferent’ and falsehoods about manufacturing chains.

TKS
TKS
1 year ago
Reply to  Kamina

Hey you jumped on MY post to banter, not the other way around. VIP (VIC) status at Hermes, Vuitton, Dior etc are much more fun than Chanel’s, who, IMO has never gotten that part figured out well. I will let my status slide away at Chanel also, as the other houses really do pursue customers with more fervor and perks.

Paris
Paris
1 year ago
Reply to  Kamina

Yes, you are perfectly accurate.

Remi
Remi
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

When you state that Chanel despises accessories customers, etc. what are your references? I’m interested in researching this topic more. Thx.

TKS
TKS
1 year ago
Reply to  Remi

Just talk to anyone who is well-versed and connected with Chanel. It’s common knowledge. I know just about all there is to know about the brand, front and back ends, good and bad, and many many many conversations with brand ambassadors, store directors and of course all of my SA. Only when I started to really purchase RTW did my main boutique start ordering inventory specifically for me in their seasonal buy, and giving me the option for getting anything I wanted shipped from Europe. That’s despite having previously spent maybe close to 7 figures on mostly bags (plenty of exotics too when Chanel was still making them – and double boo for that ceasing).

TheCityGirl
TheCityGirl
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

Almost a million… on bags? Is that what you meant by 7 figures? Is that USD? Wow.

TKS
TKS
1 year ago
Reply to  TheCityGirl

Yes.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  TKS

A very comprehensive observation TKS! In fact, I can totally imagine having long conversations with you! Regarding what you said, possibly the vision held by Chanel today is an intermix of all of them. Chanel herself popularised faux-pearl jewellery and loved the practicality of the 2.55 bag, the Wertheimers relied on the perfumes and Karl was more focused on RTW. Every brand has its unique set of circumstances, some are very memorable, some not so innocent. In fact, the Volkswagen Beetle was advocated by Adolf Hitler, but that isn’t stopping it from being massively popular. It’s a bit similar with Chanel I’d say, in its attempt to temper down its past (like Chanel’s involvement with the Nazis), it’s being adverse towards some of the things she preferred liked the accessories. But they’re still a core part of its heritage/vision/identity nonetheless.

Hera
Hera
1 year ago

Yes, there are a lot of brands still going strong today that supported the nazis, but that doesn’t mean it’s a case of “oh well, everybody did it back then!”. There are also plenty of brands that boycotted that fascist regime instead of profiting from it.
Now it wasn’t just the Volkswagen Beetle that was advocated by Hitler, the whole brand was created for the nazis by Porsche (the Porsche family was very dedicated to Hitler and still has very questionable ethics). To this day they produce in countries with dictatorships, using forced labour, which they continued straight after Concentration Camps weren’t available anymore. They currently opened a factory amidst Uyghur labour camps. The statement the previous CEO made in defence of using forced labour was “let the natives deal with it”.
What I want to say with this, is that it is a big deal to have supported a fascist regime and brands that are guilty of that need to make VERY clear that they do not align with that ideology today. It doesn’t sit well with me that Chanel keeps using Gabrielle as an idol for its products.
Unfortunately I love flap bags, but I don’t want to constantly hear that the secret zipper compartment was used to store her nazi love letters in it. Please distance yourselves from that woman. I think this shouldn’t be a discussion about what a misunderstood being Chanel was, but whether we can separate the artist from the artwork.

Mo Miss (MoMiss)
Mo Miss (MoMiss)
1 year ago
Reply to  Hera

Glad I only own one Chanel flap purse

Hera
Hera
1 year ago

Same here. It was my holy grail bag, but the more I learn about the company, the less excited I am about the flap. On top of that, the blatant quality decline is quite cheeky. It doesn’t feel like luxury shopping if you have to worry about GHW chipping o.o

Kamina
Kamina
1 year ago
Reply to  Hera

Love this remark. Yes, people constantly find excuses (the Wertheimers) to absolve the house’s founder’s nazi roots, but they always forget the fact that Lagerfeld has transfigured her into some feminist icon; today the house still continues to extol her. No other fashion house extols their founder like Chanel (e.g. just look at their Inside Chanel series)

anonymouspeeps
anonymouspeeps
1 year ago
Reply to  Hera

The way Hera broke this down is EVERY.THING.

Hera
Hera
1 year ago
Reply to  anonymouspeeps

Cheers!

Julia
Julia
1 year ago
Reply to  Hera

I came for the article, stayed for TKS exclusively.

Jerri R
Jerri R
1 year ago
Reply to  Julia

She is the best. I would read it with interest if she smears jam on a napkin.

Gayle
Gayle
1 year ago

I have always been a chanel lover. When i went to paris 10 years ago i told myself i wont leave without buying a chanel bag. I was never an LV fan and other brands come and go in my life but i always still keep buying chanel. I always say she is the only one who stand in my birkin and kelly dreams one day. Everything about chanel i love—tweed pearls rainbow bags and hardware filigree patchwork bags the soft totes their beautiful pastel colors i can go on and on. I just hate their constant price increase but still that wont keep me from buying preloved pieces.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Gayle

I love your ardent devotion for the brand!

Donna Hubbard-Leach
1 year ago

What makes me a Chanel person? When I was in college in 1982, studying fashion, I first learned about the brand. Karl Lagerfeld was ‘on the scene’, a

EST
EST
1 year ago

But Chanel, while literally in a league of its own (price-wise), seems to be fidgety regarding its definition of the “Chanel girl/lady/woman/possibly Pharell Williams”.

IKR – love this description! great article

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  EST

? Wouldn’t have been possible without Mr. Williams!

Julia
Julia
1 year ago

I’m not a Chanel person. I own a vintage suit, I wear my pearls, I own a CF, but none of this makes me a lover of the image of the brand. I’m not naïve to not know that the reason people buy it is to show other that they can afford something expensive, even if done subconsciously.

TKS was right to tear down Chanel; the image and brand are all lies. Chanel is not a good person, and the Wertheimers are lucky enough to just keep jacking up the prices because of demand from one or two regional markets. Everything she wrote about Karl was understated, the man was a Nazi supporter himself, and a big time racist on top of all the other “charming” attributes he had. Their clothes and bags aren’t what they used to be and many bag makers can attest that the ever so luxurious lambskin used on the bags are a cheaply made product meant for the inner lining of the bag to give it structure.

I haven’t been a recipient to Chanel’s bad customer service, and I own a few pieces. I’ve been a Dior girl from the age of 13, and it’s not something that’s going to change anytime soon.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Julia

It certainly is worth speculating how many of us buy into their product line even if we don’t necessarily support their image. Would you say buying Chanel is like a guilty pleasure?

Also, I love Dior too! Especially their obscure, discontinued bags like the Bar tote, total fave!

Julia
Julia
1 year ago

The reason why I bought the CF is as simple as this: I fell for the hype. I’ve wanted a CF since I was 16 years old, like I couldn’t care less what kind of car I drive, or the size of my appt. I was fixed on getting a CF in a colour I liked from a very young age and so, now that I can afford it, I did it. Not sure if I’ll make such a plunge again, but it is what it is. I’m very happy with my purchase and I plan on being buried with it 😀

Dior is the bomb, their bags (mainly in the Galliano era) were so weird and avant garde; as are some of their pieces and accessories!!!! I have an ethnic tote in cream leather, its absolutely gorgeous.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Julia

As Hera mentioned below about separating the art from the artist, we should totally enjoy Chanel and Dior pieces without letting Karl’s/Galliano’s prejudices come in our way!

FashionableLena
FashionableLena
1 year ago

I realized that I wasn’t a Chanel person a long time ago. I own exactly one bag. I would like a wallet and a classic pair of earrings. Other than that…not interested. Every time I look at the bags, I think “old lady”. Not my style.

To be honest, I’ve never looked too deep into designers. I read a book about Coco Chanel a few years ago. Wasn’t moved not to buy anything. I’ve always been good at separating the artist from the art.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago

I can understand the “old lady” sentiment and I guess I was trying to not make that typecast here (sigh..). Which bag do you own though? I’m presuming it isn’t quilted?

FashionableLena
FashionableLena
1 year ago

It’s not quilted. It’s a Twisted Flap. I think it’s from 2010. I’m not a fan of the classic flap, but I could go for a black Reissue with palladium hardware.

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago

The Twisted Flap’s aesthetic is so different from the rest of Chanel’s, I love how relaxed and casual it is!

Rip
Rip
1 year ago

I really enjoyed this article! I think it’s true about who these designers see as their “spokesperson.”

I’ve never seen myself represented as a first gen, Latinx queer. I think that’s what is great about designers that are seen on a range of folks, so that everyone can either feel represented or aspire to own some of these labels!

Sajid Bin Mohammad
Sajid Bin Mohammad
1 year ago
Reply to  Rip

That’s very true, moreover a designer’s vision doesn’t really have to do anything with gender, a vision IMO not only defines their customers but appeals to all the other ones out there as well who could potentially buy into this image. So it’s ever-expanding I’d say!

Want It? Buy Now!