Louis Vuitton’s history lies in the art of travel, and it’s arguable that if it were not for the revolution that took place within the world of travel in the mid-late 1800s, the brand would not be what it is today. Monsieur Louis Vuitton built his business on a foundation of trunkmaking, and Louis Vuitton’s travel pieces are at the core of the brand’s DNA still to this day. It was Mr. Vuitton’s connection to the Parisian Haute Couture world that helped him identify and understand the needs of those going from place to place.

The History of an Icon

One necessity created by Louis Vuitton himself is a revolutionary accessory that remains a beloved and coveted item to this day. If you’re a fan of the brand, it’s likely that you know, or own, this item, but you may not realize that it has historical roots and is more than 120 years old. Crafted from coated canvas, the iconic Louis Vuitton Toiletry Pouch was created in 1901 and has become a true icon for the House.

For decades, Louis Vuitton fans and celebs alike have been carrying the Toiletry Pouch as a clutch, which, truthfully, gives you a lot of bang for your buck. Even Princess Diana was spotted exiting a Yacht in the 90s with one tucked under her arm. The brand itself is well aware of this trend, and recently Louis Vuitton got smart, monetizing this trend by introducing a chain version of the beloved pouch. And, not surprisingly, they’ve seemed to discontinue an old icon in the meantime.

Princess Diana Toiletry Pouch

Fans worldwide have been speculating since spring that the Toiletry Pouch was getting the oust, with some believing it was just rumors and others stating their SA’s had indeed confirmed the rumors. A call to client services earlier this summer yielded mixed results, with a rep stating while there was no stock to be had, the official decision hasn’t been made yet. Unfortunately, if you’re looking to buy one right now, the resale market is your best bet, and it will come at a premium.

Introducing the Toiletry Pouch On Chain

Now, we’ve got a look at what the brand had up its sleeve: the introduction of a Toiletry Pouch on a chain. Which, of course, comes at a much heftier price tag. At the last listing, the Toiletry Pouch retailed for $580, while the new Toiletry Pouch On Chain will set you back $1,760. A description for the bag states that it was, in fact, inspired by the Louis Vuitton clients themselves who used the Pouch as a clutch.

The new piece has been reworked, though, likely in part to justify its high price tag. A removable chain has been added as well as leather trims. Hidden inside is a mini version of the beloved pouch, and both items can be used separately or together. What do you think?

Louis Vuitton Double Toiletry Pouch on Chain
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

30 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Marcy
Marcy
5 months ago

The OG was ideal to carry your toiletries and a good companion for pool-side necessities. But a pretty sad-looking bag. It always looked like someone who was trying too hard.

This official version of the DIY pouch-to-bag creatures is pretty awful. In the end, I have more respect for someone who can’t afford an actual handbag thus engineers one out of a toiletry pouch and a chain bought at a Hobby Lobby-esque store rather than this overpriced monstrosity.

Leverne
Leverne
5 months ago
Reply to  Marcy

Exactly! Well said Marcy

Snibor
Snibor
5 months ago

Long time LV purchaser and I think this is fabulous. Classic but functional. Easy to wear. The idea you “shouldn’t” or “can’t” because it was a toiletry seems elitist and close minded. You like it why not? It’s just a small, cute bag.

Lori
Lori
5 months ago

I wish more brands would have really simple shoulder bags that are easy to get into. This one actually seems really smart to me.

Shawn
Shawn
5 months ago

I changed out the chain for a leather strap from another LV bag and made it a crossbody. Super cute.

psny15
psny15
5 months ago

This looks so Tacky and DIY! Are “influencers” now working at Louis Vuitton

Kaly
Kaly
5 months ago

$1700+ for that??!? Hard pass…

VSQR
VSQR
5 months ago

What a great idea!! It’s minimalistic, functional and really a multipurpose handbag ❤️❤️❤️❤️

Chloe
Chloe
5 months ago

This was never a bag to begin with. Only cheap gold diggers who hadn’t netted their first husband used this as a bag to match their black loubs and you can’t change my mind. Can LV stop ripping people off and keep it discontinued and in the past?

Goal-digger
Goal-digger
5 months ago
Reply to  Chloe

I became the “rich man” by becoming a software engineer, so I don’t need to marry some rich man to buy me expensive things.

LVand Me
LVand Me
5 months ago
Reply to  Chloe

Was princess Diana a gold digger?

Nakeia Sharawn
Nakeia Sharawn
5 months ago
Reply to  Chloe

Who needs a husband to buy a LV bag. 🙄

Jacquie Elizabeth
Jacquie Elizabeth
5 months ago
Reply to  Nakeia Sharawn

Right? I have been married and I find it easier being divorced to have a lovely collection of bags I enjoy. No one to answer to or to judge me. For the record I receive no alimony.

Sarah
Sarah
5 months ago

You were just married to the wrong person(s).

seattleminimalist
seattleminimalist
5 months ago

Interesting, since I’ve been using my own LV toiletries pouch as a clutch + LV cardholder for a while now. 🙂

Fabuleux
Fabuleux
5 months ago

I realize this post is quite old already but I had a really interesting conversation with the store manager at my boutique, which confirmed everything I have heard from friends working for LV. In a few words, he explained that Louis Vuitton is harmonizing its client base by significantly raising prices across the board. Entry-level items are either discontinued or receive a steep price increase. All of us contributing to PB and TPF noticed this trend over the past few years… a trend that seems to accelerate lately. Additionally, prices for repair services are also going up.

You might ask… “What does harmonizing its client base mean, Fabuleux?”. Anyone who’s been in an LV store has noticed that the spectrum of clients go from very wealthy elites to the local riffraff. It’s politically incorrect but a fair observation. It’s also an issue that brands like Hermès and Chanel don’t face—at least not to the same degree.

“The company wants to move upmarket in order to change the type of customers who buy Louis Vuitton,” said the SM. “They want less customers who have to save in order to purchase a bag, a wallet, or a keyring in order to reposition themselves as a true luxury brand,” he added. “In order to preserve its luxury status, the brand must remain inaccessible to a large portion of consumers.” To make up for the portion of customers who might get priced out, prices are increasing. The hope is also to (re)capture customers who currently consider Louis Vuitton too common or associate the brand with crowds they don’t want to be identified with. [I’m not getting into the moral, ethical, cultural, and socio-political issues that plague the luxury industry].

Many will remember the article that described Louis Vuitton as a brand for secretaries a few years ago. The undeniable saturation of the market combined with the high visibility of its products have damaged the brand’s standing and the aura of its monogram canvas. The comment section of PB often features posts to that effect.

Certainly, Louis Vuitton is not alone here. All luxury brands have been raising prices, sometimes dramatically so. Just recently, PB users were outraged over Chanel’s continued price increases. Companies need to find the right balance between short-term earnings and long-term growth. Stay tuned!

Year Of The Rabbit