18 posts tagged with Haircalf

Calling all animal print lovers, this is an animal print handbag you do not want to miss out on. While procrastinating on doing my ever-so-interesting homework (hopefully my professors aren’t reading this), the Tory Burch …

There are few things I love more than the color black. I wear it all summer, I’ve been known to dye my hair jet black, and when I was a little kid going to kindergarten …

Gaging a trend’s lifespan can be a precarious endeavor, particularly when that trend is born out of something like leopard print, which is an innate classic whether its haters want to admit it or not. It’s been around for ages, and even though it tends to fall in and out of favor cyclically, it will never leave the style world entirely. For leopard lovers like me, that’s a beautiful thing.

Over the past couple of seasons, though, leopard has been pushed by every brand from Givenchy to the Gap. I find this Yves Saint Laurent Cabas Chyc Tote in leopard haircalf exceptionally beautiful, but thanks to overexposure, it does occur to me that some of you might disagree. We’ve set up a handy-dandy poll to measure your leopard fatigue after the jump, or you can buy this bag via Nordstrom for $2795. (more…)

Kate Spade Crown Point Sasha Shoulder Bag, $495 via Nordstrom

Maybe it’s always been this way and I just don’t remember it, or maybe the advent of leopard print as a trend has changed prices a bit, but calf hair is expensive. Monetarily, it’s positioned as a semi-exotic; it costs more than regular leather but a bit less than a brand would charge for it’s lowest-tier exotic leather. In layman’s terms, that’s means it’s kind of spendy.

Some contemporary brands use the material, of course, but many of them choose to go with printed suede when it comes to leopard because it provides texture without jacking up their materials costs. And that’s why I love the Kate Spade Crown Point Sasha Shoulder Bag; it uses calf hair in a very of-the-moment way without passing the extra cost along to the company’s customers. (more…)

Agent Provocateur Leopard Print Calf Hair Driving Gloves, $500 via Net-a-Porter. Prada Calfskin Tote, $2500 via Neiman Marcus.

Good news: Megs and I have returned to Manhattan! Bad news: We’re still getting back up to speed, so things will be a bit slow today and then totally back to normal tomorrow, and we hope that readers who were affected by the hurricane are also well on their way back to normalcy. For now, though, I’d like to spend a moment touching on my aversion to black bags.

Black, as a color, is one of my favorites. It always has been, even during childhood when most little girls fawned over pink; when everyone else in my first grade class had a pair of white Keds, I had black ones. But now, because I wear so much black clothing, wearing black accessories and shoes just feels really…dull. Even a black bag as beautiful and functional as the Prada Calfskin Tote can’t make it into my wardrobe without a good game plan for spicing it up. I think that the Agent Provocateur Leopard Print Calf Hair Driving Gloves would do just the trick for fall. (more…)

Alexander McQueen Calf Hair Crossbody, $2345 via Neiman Marcus.

That would be the summer-to-fall transition, not the spring-to-summer transition that we’re all experiencing right now. Is all this talk about heading into fall driving anyone else crazy? Even though I’m the one doing most of it in these parts, it’s about to shove me right off the deep end, so I know that some of you have probably noticed. Fall seems like a distant dream with temperatures rising and the unofficial start of summer just passing mere days ago, but fashion waits for no woman, and Pre-Fall and Fall 2011 are everywhere.

The Alexander McQueen Calf Hair Crossbody might not ship until early September, but at the very least, it’s the sort of piece that you can wear immediately upon arrival instead of waiting for the weather to turn genuinely cold. That might be of little comfort, but summer in the fashion industry is deathly slow, and we have to talk about something. So fall it is! (more…)

Haircalf is such a versatile bag trend that it’s only a matter of time before it makes its way around to more or less every designer on the face of the planet, and I for one couldn’t be happier. Not only does it provide texture without looking messy or too “furry,” but the presence of haircalf also often means that designers are willing to play with pattern, as with the Rebecca Minkoff Haircalf Boyfriend Mini Bag.

Something about the material just makes stripes, spots and animal prints seem so appropriate, and any way to get more print and texture into an outfit is a way that I approve. (more…)

With the roaring popularity of leopard print seemingly chugging into spring unabated (Givenchy, anyone?), it looks like haircalf bags are here to stay. For those of you who wince at furry things of any type, that’s too bad. For those of us who like the slick, neat look of a good haircalf bag, this development couldn’t find us any more pleased. What’s even better is that the material’s popularity for leopard bags and shoes has started to spill out into other bag inspiration, which is perhaps why we now have the option of the Be&D Genesis Satchel in super slick black pony.

Because I have a 15-year-old goth living inside of me somewhere who refuses to leave, one of my favorite cold-weather looks is layered black in lots of different textures. The look gives a whiff of badass to whomever dons it, and a bag like this is the absolute perfect way to tie up an intensely dark, brooding outfit. (more…)

I love the leopard trend, but it does have one negative side effect: it tends to make bags either really expensive or really…nylon. Printing on leather can be awkward, and most designers choose to either go furry or avoid natural and natural-seeming materials entirely. Calf hair can shoot the price of a bag up by hundreds of dollars (although I’m still not entirely clear on why), so if you’re on a budget, you’re often left to deal with a dowdy synthetic.

Until now – the Elie Tahari Selena Tote manages to give you leopard-printed calf hair without a significant price increase over the leather version of the same bag. It’s about time, eh? (more…)

Leopard has received a lot of editorial love and fashionista attention for the past six weeks or so, and the trend is only going to pick up more steam as fall rolls in and cold-weather trends take over our sartorial existences. Even with all the tongue-wagging that has been done over the print, a lot of women I hear from still don’t really know how to work it into their wardrobes in bag form.

But it’s easy, really. Choose leopard print in the type of bag that’s going to be used when you’re unlikely to be wearing other patterns or clashing colors – a clutch! The Rebecca Minkoff Leopard Print Fling Minaudiere, for instance. (more…)

No, they didn’t, but they somehow managed to make it look like that’s exactly what happened.

Haircalf and animal print are big this season, but I don’t find myself as skeeved out by the average leopard print bag as I am by the Hinge Animal Print Calf Hair Hobo. At first I wasn’t sure why, but then it occurred to me – animals like the one from whence this pattern (which seems to fall somewhere in the realm of “generalized livestock”) came are exactly the animals used to manufacture bags. Just like most of us have probably never plucked a chicken before, it’s a bit unsettling to be confronted by what appears to be an untreated, untouched hide. No one’s making bags out of actual leopard, so those bags don’t give me the same feeling of unease. (more…)

Most of the shock value of Coach releasing a bag with a four-figure price tag wore off years ago, but the disparity between the prices of the Coach Madison Calf Hair Brynne Satchel and the Coach Madison Ocelot Sabrina Satchel truly caught be off guard.

The Brynne, left, is made of printed calf hair with leather trim and is 14 inches wide. The Sabrina, on the right, is nylon with leather trim and measures 12 inches across. If you had shown me the bags and asked me to guess, I would have pegged the Brynne at about $700 – one of Coach’s pricier offerings, but not out of the brand’s normal range these days. The Sabrina would have been much lower, probably about $300. On one count, I would have been remarkably close (not much of an accomplishment, considering that this is my job); on the other, not so much. (more…)