Here’s Hilary Duff, leaving a fitness studio in West Hollywood, carrying a Louis Vuitton Speedy Empreinte 25 Bandoulière Bag and a Goyard St. Louis Tote. Strangely enough, we’ve seen Hilary carry both of these bags before, which is a definite first/sign of the end times. We know from extensive research that Hilary uses her many lightweight, durable Goyard totes as diaper bags and gym bags fairly frequently. Goyard doesn’t sell its bags online, but you can find Hilary’s Speedy for $2,840 at Louis Vuitton.

Hilary Duff’s handbag collection seems to expand exponentially with every passing season. If you feel the need to keep abreast of every Duff acquisition in recent history, you’ve certainly come to the right place. Though, be warned: it’s an alarming amount of handbags. Check out “The Many Bags of Hilary Duff” and “The Many Bags of Hilary Duff, Part 2.”

Louis Vuitton has always had one of the more comprehensive websites of the major handbag brands – it’s always had e-commerce, and even for pieces not sold online, prices and color options were generally available for shopper’ perusal – but it’s never been one of the more functional of fashion’s branded sites. Thanks to Nicolas Ghesquiere and his new vision for the brand, all that has changed. Please say the appropriate thank-yous to the deity of your choice. (more…)

We already know what Louis Vuitton’s quest for fancier customers means on the high end of the brand’s price spectrum, but changes in LV’s mid-range bags, like those made of Epi or Vernis leather, have been a little slower to materialize. As a business strategy, that’s somewhat predictable – give people something super-expensive over which to work themselves into a lather, and then roll out incrementally more accessible options that embody the same style to capture greater market share. Thus, we bring you news of the brand new Louis Vuitton Marly Bag. (more…)

We brought you the first look at Nicolas Ghesquiere’s inaugural campaign for Louis Vuitton two weeks ago, and since then, the brand has slowly released new images from legendary photographers Bruce Weber, Juergen Teller and Annie Leibovitz. We’ve collected them for examination, and if nothing else, they show a new creative director with an exceptionally clear vision.

Ghesquiere’s view of Vuitton, seen through both the photographs and the clothes themselves, is markedly less obviously glam than that of predecessor Marc Jacobs. Take a look at the new images below – are you excited for what Nicolas Ghesquiere has in store at Vuitton?

Every bag lover knows the iconic Louis Vuitton monogram pattern, but the House of Louis Vuitton dates back to the mid-1850s and has a long line of heritage and craftsmanship. My newest obsession is the Louis Vuitton Capucines bags, whose name pays homage to the earliest Louis Vuitton Maison, which was located on rue Neuve-des-Capucines in 1854.

The signature bag may look simple, but it’s anything but. The bag is a marriage of two leathers: rounded, strong bull-calf leather alongside supple, silky calfskin. The combination adds a level of discreet elegance that is hard to ignore.

Consumers have turned away from monograms as a whole, from luxury designers and contemporary brands like Coach alike, and clearly Louis Vuitton listens to its shoppesr. Sure, some may still want to buy the classic monogram bags, but many prefer the timeless elegance that remains part of the brand’s heritage.

With the Capucines, you get an extremely very well-made bag, which takes over 250 individual handcrafted operations to arrive at the final product. The colors vary season to season, with one of my favorite renditions right now following the snakeskin handle trend.

Another special touch surrounds Louis Vuitton’s initials, which have never been seen in this interpretation. The LV initials are sheathed in bull-calf leather and then inserted into claws set into the grain of the leather. It may not seem like a big deal, but this is new for the brand and took its craftsmen much careful development.

When I learned the intricate design details that went into production of this bag, I expected higher price tags. And with the Capucines, you are looking at some of the largest price tags Vuitton offers for its leather bags. A Capucines can be had for $4,400 for the smaller BB, $5,600 for the MM, and $6,050 for the GM via Louis Vuitton.

While Louis Vuitton’s women’s business has been in a state of flux over the past two seasons, the men’s side has been humming along quite nicely in the hands of creative director Kim Jones. Jones’ has done a great deal in his relatively short tenure at the brand to make the men’s line distinctive, including creating its own logo of sorts. For Louis Vuitton Men’s Spring 2015, Jones continued to build on that foundation. (more…)

If you need a demonstration of how differently Nicolas Ghesquiere sees Louis Vuitton than predecessor Marc Jacobs, look no further than the Louis Vuitton Fall 2014 ad campaign, Ghesquiere’s first at the brand, which was unveiled by Women’s Wear Daily yesterday. The photos, shot be legends Bruce Weber, Annie Leibovitz and Juergen Teller, are quite the departure from the LV we’ve known for over a decade and a half. (more…)

Here’s Brazilian supermodel Adriana Lima, enjoying the luxuries of being rich and beautiful in Miami Beach, toting a Louis Vuitton Stephen Sprouse Graffiti Neverfull Tote. Although Neverfulls are pretty expensive, and this one in particular is quite rare, Neverfulls actually do make pretty great beach totes for those with the funds, as long as you don’t mind getting a little sand in the lining. They’re extremely lightweight, roomy and durable.

Adriana’s bright, bold bag is a nice change of pace from the onslaught of muted pink Louis Vuitton Soft Lockits we’ve seen celebs carrying over the last several weeks. We recently posted an extremely comprehensive guide to the Louis Vuitton Neverfull, which is a must-read if you’re planning on acquiring one any time in the near future. You can also check out more of Adriana’s choice designer handbags in our special feature “50+ Bags on the Arms of Our Favorite Supermodels.”

Even if you’re not a sports fan, you’re probably well aware by now that a lil’ soccer tournament has started down in Brazil. The 2014 World Cup is here to keep us entertained for the next few weeks, and when it’s done, the winning team will not only receive bragging rights for the next four years, but also a little bit of Louis Vuitton.

Just like it did in 2010, Louis Vuitton is set to provide the case for the official World Cup trophy, which can accurately be described as a nubby hunk of solid gold. According to Vogue UK, the case was hand-made in the brand’s Asnières atelier and includes all the well-loved Vuitton signatures, including a heavy dose of monogram canvas.

With Louis Vuitton’s renewed focus on leather, it would have been nice to see the brand whip out some alligator or python for such a special occasion, but neither of those provide the opportunity for such clear visual branding on the global stage of the World Cup.

If you were going to win a trophy for Best Whatever It Is That You Do, who would you want to design the case?

When you’re trying to give your brand a refreshed, ultra-exclusive sheen in the face of a consumer market that has grown tired of its flash, aligning the brand with well-respected artists, designers and aesthetic thinkers is one of the tried-and-true paths to take toward redemption. When you have the coffers of LVMH at your disposal, that strategy becomes writ large – for Louis Vuitton Icon and Iconoclasts, Louis Vuitton has tapped rival Karl Lagerfeld, as well as Christian Louboutin, Comme des Garcons’ Rei Kawakubo, architect Franky Gehry, photographer Cindy Sherman and industrial designer Mark Newson to create bags or luggage celebrating Vuitton’s iconic monogram. (more…)

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