The more I see of the Fall/Winter 2010 shows, particularly the ones from Milan, the more I become certain that the fashion industry glitterati have clandestine meetings after the season has been presented to decide what the trends for the next season will be, just so everyone else is on the same page. That, or it’s secretly just one supergenius (or supercomputer?) behind every major collection, and that’s why everything from Gucci to Fendi to Ferragamo this season has been so cohesive – not just within each collection, but across much of what has been shown at Fashion Week as a whole.

If the brands that I normally make fun of continue to turn out impressive bag collections, what am I going to crack jokes about? With the second lovely presentation by Fendi in as many seasons, it looks like before I know it, the only time I’m going to get to be nasty and snarky is when Versace puts forth a new abomination against handbag design.

Let’s not mince words about the handbags that went down the Bottega Veneta runway last week in Milan: I cannot recall ever seeing a runway collection that included so many different kinds of bags, all of them utterly beautiful. I’m not even that enormous of a Bottega fan and I was still awed by the details that went into all of them, from oversized crocodile hobos to the tiniest embellished knot clutches.

Allow me to make one of my personal biases clear: I look forward to seeing the bags on the Gucci runway more than almost any other bag-including show at fashion week. The brand’s notorious sense for modern glamor and sexuality often comes through best in their runway bags, and seeing them is almost always a pleasure.

I wasn’t as excited by this season’s offerings as I was for last season’s technology-influenced collection, but they were still as luxurious and detailed as you could reasonably ask.

This past Sunday, I attended the Moncler Grenoble FW 2010 presentation, and being a bag person, I was immediately drawn towards the use of fanny packs. Let’s just say it was rather extensive. Models stood motionless on four levels of scaffolding; spotlights shone on different groups of them to the tune of classical and opera music. I daresay it was all very dramatic and lovely, since I’m a personal fan of Moncler, but I couldn’t help but wonder about the fanny packs.

I’ll be blunt: Marc Jacobs is New York Fashion Week. It’s the show that everyone wants to go to and no one can stop talking about, and it may have produced more activity from the people I follow on Twitter than the Super Bowl. In a way, I suppose, it’s sort of the same thing, just for a vastly different group of people.

In my mind, there are two types of designers: those that make us think about fashion and its relationship to philosophy and art, and those that make fashion accessible and wearable to the average fashion fan. Each pursuit has its own challenges, but it’s without question that Diane Von Furstenberg has the second type of clothing on lock.

Menswear was a dominant theme in DVF’s Fall/Winter 2010 collection, but it was styled in such a way that it would be totally accessible and wearable outside of an office setting.

Does anyone remember a little film called The Craft, a tale of four goth-y, snarky teen witches and the classmates that they hated? You have to think back almost 15 years, to a time when I was merely a tween exploring my burgeoning love of black clothing that I have come to embrace now, at this later juncture in my life.

Do you feel that special tingle in the air? Smell that scent – the combined perfumes of a thousand magazine editors and well-heeled fashionistas, waiting impatiently in an enclosed space? Sense the Earth itself spinning ever-so-slightly, almost imperceptibly out of its natural orbit? Only one thing can be to blame: the advent of New York Fashion Week.

While my compatriots up north trudge through the snow and wait on line for the crashers in front of them to get turned away, I’ll be lounging in my climate-controlled apartment, eating pita chips and drinking white wine that came from a screw-top bottle (I’m not ashamed).

A day before the Rebecca Minkoff Fall 2010 presentation was slated to begin, Rebecca herself tweeted, “Who is afraid of a little snow??? The show must go on!” Well, that was before “a little snow” turned out to be a full-on blizzard that was enough to close all public and private schools and universities in Manhattan save for Columbia University (thanks guys.)

Therefore, if I was going to have classes as the snow frantically swirled around the city, I was going to make it to the Rebecca Minkoff presentation.

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