When I used to think of corduroy, I’d think of a hideous pair of pants that my grandmother made me wear every single winter throughout elementary school.

They were warm, yes – but the vertical chords of the fabric somehow highlighted the already awful cut of the pants and made them somehow seem even nerdier than if they were just simply ugly on their own. Every time I wore them, I felt I looked stuffy and dated. As far as I was concerned, I couldn’t outgrow them fast enough.

When I got older, I still didn’t really know why corduroy had such a bad rep. My own opinion of it was pretty neutral. It was just a sensible fabric – something perfect to protect you from wind chill, but still not something I’d consider to be particularly stylish. Sure, it had a moment in the ‘60s, but then again, so were dresses made out of PVC.

However, these last few years, I’ve learned that corduroy can look cute if styled correctly. Even Vogue has gone so far as to claim it to be cool-girl approved. But if it’s so cool, why do so few bag brands use it? I’m sure it’s something many vintage fashion lovers would love to experiment with.

Modest or Mod-ish?

Despite the name having come from the French ‘Cord du roi’ (chords of the king,) Corduroy isn’t all that fancy. It’s a no-frills fabric that’s historically been worn more by the working class than it ever was by nobility. It’s versatile and hard-wearing – a type of “poor man’s velvet” that 18th-century tailors saw as perfect for laborers who were routinely exposed to the elements.

Much like denim, the humbleness of Corduroy came to really appeal to the masses. Once everyone got wind of how low-maintenance it is, it became the go-to fabric for everyone from members of academia to British boy bands alike.

The Key to Cold-Weather Cool

I don’t know if humility makes anything made of Corduroy seem like a relic of the past. All I know is that the few luxury brands who dare to use it seem to have all perfected the art of cold-weather cool.

I’ve finally left my hatred of those pants in the past, and I’m open to giving Corduroy a second chance, so here are a few of my favorites I’ve found around the web:

Chanel

Chanel Corduroy Bag
Chanel 19 Bag
via Chanel

Gucci

Gucci Dionysus

Loro Piana

Loro Piano Cord Bag

A.P.C

APC Demi Lune Bag

Ralph Lauren

Ralph Lauren Wellington Bag
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psny15
psny15
1 month ago

These look terrible new so after a few uses they will look even worse

Lala
Lala
1 month ago

Love the Ralph Lauren Welington

lalarey
lalarey
1 month ago
Reply to  Lala

it is gorgeous. and will age beautifully.

Klara P
Klara P
1 month ago

On fabric for bags – Tweed, yes. Silk & brocade, depends. Corduroy & shearling, no.

Gayle
Gayle
1 month ago
Reply to  Klara P

I feel exactly the same way!

Adangerousbeauty
Adangerousbeauty
1 month ago

No to all types of fabric bags. Not paying premium for fabric vs real leather.

Havana
Havana
1 month ago

Exactly!

Ζoe
Ζoe
1 month ago

No the don’t.

B.irkin
B.irkin
1 month ago

Corduroy makes old and outdated – a clear no ! Always looks like Thrift shops and one expects a certain odor.. Tweed looks like old style – a yes !

Slim
Slim
1 month ago

I’ll pass!

Olivia Penzey
Olivia Penzey
1 month ago

Is Loro Piana kidding with that price?

GG Pastel