The fashion industry is as much about promotion as art as it is about clothing and accessories as art. Without a well-honed message, it’s pretty difficult to get anyone to spend thousands of dollars, no matter how pretty the product. During designer transitions, a brand’s ability to self-promote is even more important; it needs both to explain to existing customers why they shouldn’t look elsewhere and attract new customers who had previously ignored the brand.

If you’re not a Twitter fiend or an emoji junkie, then move right along. If, like me, you need to check your phone constantly, lest you fall apart from the crushing sense that you’re probably missing something super important, the Edie Parker Hashtag and Emoji Clutches that just hit Moda Operandi are speaking you language, both literally and figuratively. The clutches feature either popular iPhone emojis or corresponding Twitter hashtags, and when paired with the matching Del Toro Slippers (also an M’O exclusive), you’ve basically turned yourself into a walking smartphone.

Luggage is ugly, almost without exception. I’ve spent two days of the last week traipsing through four separate airports on six distinct occasions, so I’ve had a lot of time to stare at people’s suitcases, and they don’t vary a whole lot. And, you know, I get it. They’re durable, they’re functional, they get thrown into cargo holds. The Charlotte Olympia Excess Baggage Perspex Clutch, on the other hand, is basically the exact opposite of a real suitcase – it’s beautiful, but please don’t hand it over to a member of TSA.

Considering how many eyes, animal and faces we’ve seen on handbags over the last six months, looking at a New Arrivals page and finding a handbag that’s actually staring back at you isn’t all that jarring. The beady little eyes on the Charlotte Olympia Gummi Bear Clutch, however, were a little bit more than I was prepared to see outside the confines of a horror move about handbags that become animate and kill their owners.

Jeremy Scott is known for his somewhat flippant regard to both form and function when it comes to designing his zany, exuberant eponymous line, and now that he’s the new creative director of Moschino, we can expect more of the same from the Italian brand. Scott is, in many ways, a perfect for Moschino, a brand that likes the silly and literal as much as any other major fashion line that comes to mind.

We might as well go ahead and dub Charlotte Olympia the Queen of the Hyper-Literal Handbag, because I doubt anyone’s going to take her spot anytime soon. She’s done everything from golden-age Hollywood to flakey French baked goods, and now she’s here with a fresh crop of Christmas clutches.

As we learned back in October, designer Charlotte Dellal loves a holiday, and Christmas is rife with inspiration for funny little bags.

By now, you’ve probably heard that Hunger Games: Catching Fire went over like gangbusters at the theaters over the long weekend and set all kinds of records for November releases. Because the Hunger Games is partially set in a world of stunning opulence, fashion has come to figure rather prominently in the movie’s visuals, landing costume designer Trish Summerville lots of attention and a movie-inspired capsule collection at Net-a-Porter.

Depending on your feelings about Halloween, right now is either the most wonderful or most terrible time of the year. Personally, I love it – scary movies, candy, black clothing, what’s not to like? Apparently, Charlotte Olympia feels the same way, because the brand has released two cute-as-can-be Halloween clutches. In Charlotte Olympia tradition, they are, of course, quite literal.

It’s been several months since I wrote about the Fendi Fur Monster Bag Charm, and I’m still sort of obsessed with it. I never counted myself as the kind of person who would buy an expensive, non-functional doohickey to adorn my already expensive, probably only semi-functional handbag, and yet, I’d gladly trot around with one of those little fuzzy rascals on my bag.

Despite the fact that Women’s Wear Daily claims that what you see above is Hermes’ first-ever bicycle, we know that’s not exactly true – we’ve covered the Hermes bike in the past, and there’s one currently on sale at Hermes.com for $4,650. Still, any new Hermes goodies are notable Hermes goodies in our book.

After all, who wouldn’t love to tool around the cobblestone streets of the West Village (or, you know, Paris) atop the Le Flâneur d’Hermès or the Le Flâneur Sportif d’Hermès, the two different models in which this bike will be made?

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