The rumors have finally been confirmed: Nicolas Ghesquiere, formerly of Balenciaga, will replace Marc Jacobs as the creative head behind Louis Vuitton’s women’s division, according to an announcement made by the brand on its official Twitter account this morning. Women’s Wear Daily reports that the first collection in Ghesquiere’s tenure at Vuitton will be the Fall 2014 show in March.

Kanye West is a man with many thoughts. Thoughts about art, thoughts about Kim Kardashian, thoughts about his own brilliance and, as it turns out, thoughts about Louis Vuitton. West once regularly referred to himself as the “Louis Vuitton Don” in his lyrics, but those days have passed us by. These days, Kanye thinks about Vuitton what many of you seem to think: that the brand could use a little price adjustment.

We’ve thoroughly discussed Louis Vuitton’s plans to target more up-market customers and discourage entry-level luxury shoppers from flocking to the brand like they have in the past, and now that more and more of the brand’s Fall 2013 handbag collection is becoming available via its website, the ways that those plans will shape the brand’s leather goods going forward are coming into stark relief.

We’ve been following along with the story of Louis Vuitton’s very publicly shifting accessories strategy very closely, and each time we update you on it, you guys have a lot to say. The story and Vuitton’s attitudes toward its customers bring out a lot of opinions, both for and against the brand’s attempts to shift its focus to a more leather-centric, higher-dollar customer, but we’ve never asked you guys straight-up whether or not the shift has affected your own purchasing behavior.

Much has been made, both by us and by our commenters, over Louis Vuitton’s highly publicized strategy shift toward higher prices in hopes of discouraging entry-level luxury consumers and appealing more to customers in the Hermes income bracket. The strategy includes both price-increases on existing products and the production of more top-tier bags in leather and exotics instead of Vuitton’s signature coated canvas (often with its attendant monogram), and the latest bag to show up as a result of those plans is the Louis Vuitton Alma Bag in Taurillon Leather.

According to the Telegraph, third quarter growth for LVMH weakened to just two percent, an outcome which the conglomerate’s recent shift in strategy probably predicted. Although that’s still growth, it’s certainly a marked shift from what the world’s largest luxury company is used to and the kind of growth its counted on in the past. In LVMH’s heyday, quarterly grown was often as high as ten percent, and it had fallen to five to six percent earlier this year.

Wednesday’s news that Marc Jacobs would make his Louis Vuitton Spring 2014 show his last as the creative leader of the brand was a lot of things, but it wasn’t exactly surprising. Rumors had been swirling for months that talks to extend Jacobs’ 16-year tenure at the brand weren’t going anywhere, and in the days before the show, news outlets like Women’s Wear Daily reported that the decision had been made that Jacobs would leave to focus on expanding his own brand, in which LVMH is a major investor.

All the rumors were true, as they so often are. Yesterday’s Louis Vuitton Spring 2014 show was Marc Jacobs’ last at the helm of the brand that he’s lead for 16 years, drawing to an end one of the most prolific and lucrative partnerships in modern fashion history. Jacobs’ has never been a man for subtle statements, and he went out in a way that only he could – with an almost entirely black show that referenced some of his greatest hits for the brand and closed with a round of showgirls wearing little more than thousands of meticulously placed jet beads.

At the time of this writing, we don’t know if Marc Jacobs’ show today for Louis Vuitton will be the last in his 16-year tenure as the creative leader of the incredibly powerful French brand. What we do know, however, is what Jacobs has done for Vuitton so far, which is nothing short of turning the brand into a household name with one of the most iconic logos in fashion history.

Here’s Katie Holmes cruising around solo in NYC, carrying a Louis Vuitton Mon Monogram Neverfull Tote. In a rare move for a celeb (or anyone), Katie seems to have opted out of getting her Neverfull monogrammed, choosing instead to go with a custom-color stripe alone. Katie has quite a nuanced designer bag collection, which you can view in its entirety in “The Many Bags of Katie Holmes”!

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