Alaia Leopard Tote, $4770. Jimmy Choo Gaia Leopard Tote, $2295. Both via Net-a-Porter.

Much to my eternal delight, leopard print is going absolutely nowhere. It came on strong as an accessories trend last fall, but the pattern has been falling in and out of favor for decades and it’s here to stay as long as fashion’s love for maximalism remains strong.

Structure can be a great design element when implemented properly. In fact, some of the most timeless bags feature a bit of structure to their design, like the Hermes Birkin and Chanel Classic Flap. Yet there are times when a structured bag simply does not work, and this may be one of those times.

The Jimmy Choo Catherine Leopard-Print Satchel uses soft yet structured leather which is offset by leopard-print calf hair.

A bag doesn’t need to come from a collection with a strong and unified design vision to be good, but more often than not, the best bags do. Starting with a clear point of view gives a set of designs a singular vision and set of references from which to pull, and knowing what those are going in to the creation process tends to lead to better and more rigorous editing, something that Jimmy Choo’s Fall 2011 Handbags could have really used.

If you spend as much time on the Internet as we do (for your sanity’s sake, we hope you don’t), you’ve surely heard that a poisonous cobra has escaped from the Bronx Zoo and is now amusing and terrifying much of New York City. No one has any idea where the snake has crept off to, but now has its own hilarious Twitter account and has taken the place of Charlie Sheen as the Internet meme du jour.

We’ll be doing the requisite rundown of all of Fall 2011′s accessories trends over the next few weeks, but when I saw the Jimmy Choo Saba Python Hobo Bag, I just couldn’t help myself. Mixing textures and python are both very important for this year’s looks, and this bag combines both of them in a very wearable, functional tote.

I’ve felt more positive about Jimmy Choo’s designs for Spring 2011 than I have about the company’s handbags in what seems like quite a while, and this bag in particular is an example of what Choo tends to do right.

I’m hard on Jimmy Choo, but only because the company has such rich promise and resources that I tend to hold it to a higher standard than I would a smaller label with more limited ability to hire design firepower. To whom much is given, much is expected, and I expect greatness from Tamara Mellon and her design team. Occasionally, I get it.

For people with very expensive shoe collections or those who treasure their favorite shoes dearly, I’m sure that travelling with footwear is a consistent and irritating problem. Shoes don’t lend themselves to packing, particularly in the day and age when no one wants to check her bags for fear that they’ll be lost, stolen or some combination thereof. Not to mention the moronic baggage fees, but if you’ve got the five-figure shoe collection to tote around the world, I’ll go ahead and assume that you’re not hurting for the $25 each way.

I have previously covered the Sky Hobo which was met with positive reviews. But now I found a version I love even more, the Jimmy Choo Sky Snake-Trim Leather Hobo.

For the past couple of seasons, it has seemed as though Jimmy Choo has been a brand adrift. Caught somewhere between trying to appease its longtime customers and attempting to reach a new, younger audience with bags covered in patterns and studs and trims of various sorts, I’ve struggled at times to find something I like from Choo, a brand that has the resources and talent to be constantly churning out hits.

Just in, the Jimmy Choo Perforated Zulu Clutch is the same bag in three color options with a perforated leather finish.

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