A day before the Rebecca Minkoff Fall 2010 presentation was slated to begin, Rebecca herself tweeted, “Who is afraid of a little snow??? The show must go on!” Well, that was before “a little snow” turned out to be a full-on blizzard that was enough to close all public and private schools and universities in Manhattan save for Columbia University (thanks guys.)

Therefore, if I was going to have classes as the snow frantically swirled around the city, I was going to make it to the Rebecca Minkoff presentation.


Alexander McQueen, magnificent designer and creative role model to thousands of fashion lovers, has died of an apparent suicide. He was 40 years old.

It would be disingenuous, at this juncture, to speculate about what McQueen’s legacy will be or what impact his all-too-soon death will have, but if there is one thing I can say for sure, it’s that the world still needs Alexander McQueen.

To finish out Paris Couture Week, I thought it might be nice to have something that’s not at all intellectual or challenging. If as many of you guys go out on Thursday nights as the people in my group of friends, then Friday morning is not the time to be looking at and making sense of Difficult Fashion.

To (very loosely) paraphrase the great Raymond Carver, Jean Paul Gaultier is what we talk about when we talk about couture. In a week of shows that have left me at times both dazzled and underwhelmed (Valentino, I’m looking at you), Gaultier showed up just in time to remind us all exactly why we’re here: because only a handful of people on the face of the planet are capable of so masterfully creating clothes that make us dream.

I’m…I’m underwhelmed. And a little sad, maybe. But mostly confused. Is this what Valentino Haute Couture is supposed to look like? Are they serious? I think we’ve been tricked. Fooled. Bamboozled.

It kind of reminds me of what would happen if Balenciaga and Valentino had a baby (the term ‘Valenciaga’ has already been coined elsewhere, I can’t take credit for it), and a few of the tight minidresses are reminiscent of Herve Leger, particularly with the neon inserts that were also in the previous Leger spring collection.

First, I’d like to say that I’m so incredibly happy that Chanel Haute Couture chose to do something more interesting for their show this season than they did for their show last season. Although, if you find silver and white boring, this may be another loser for you.

Of the few shows that we’ve seen so far Givenchy Haute Couture felt the most like couture to me. As the line between a normal runway show and a couture show continues to blur and fewer brands present the highest of high fashion as time goes on and the customer base dwindles, I still thoroughly enjoy seeing a full-on, beads-and-feathers-and-funny-hats shindig.

Good news, everyone – it’s cool to be an uptight, rich plutocrat again! Adjust accordingly.

Really, where would those ideals be more appropriately on display than at the Christian Dior Haute Couture show this week in Paris? John Galliano styled his Cruella-meets-English-nobility show with riding crops and streaks of Bride of Frankenstein grey hair, and although I didn’t adore this collection as much as I did the lingerie-as-outerwear show from six months ago, I couldn’t help but smile.

The trend toward chain link totes seems like an obvious choice this season. Although totes are somewhat on the practical side of the handbag spectrum, the addition of chains to ordinary totes makes them into something special. These totes featured are far from your generic 9-to-5 envelope tote and are just as adept at toting around loads of stuff during your busy weekdays.

Great googly moogly, people. I sit here every day and talk about $2500 handbags like they’re the most normal thing in the world, so most sane people would consider me somewhat desensitized to luxury prices. And they’d probably be right – I sort of consider Balenciaga bags to be a steal, since most of their motorcycle styles are still priced under $1500.