By far one of the best parts of my first week back at school was Fashion Week – I jetted (well, ok, I took the subway) to shows before and after class. But I was highly anticipating the Rebecca Minkoff Spring 2011 show, and now I can say with full confidence that it exceeded my expectations.

I don’t dig the all-jean look that some people in fashion have embraced over the past six months, but it’s hard to argue with any outfit that includes a giant Chanel Flap Bag in one of the dusky military colors favored by fall’s trends. Photoblogger extraordinaire Tommy Ton, working the events at Lincoln Center for Style.com, managed to capture just that on the street in New York City.

In it’s second year, the Anna Wintour-created Fashion’s Night Out seemed to find its footing as both a social and media event. Capital-F Fashion people were sharing their experiences and photos all over Twitter, from Olsen Twin-anchored cattle calls at Barneys to velvet rope, guest-list-only fetes at Ferragamo and Madewell. The crowds were huge this year, bigger than last year by a wide margin, and nary a luxury brand or retailer with a New York outpost sat out the festivities.

It’s that time of year again! Time for runway shows and cool parties and capital-F Fashion. Even if you’re not going to the shows or parties, your opinions still matter – you’re one of the people who will be buying the ready-to-wear, shoes and handbags that come down the runway at Fashion Week. With shows starting today in New York for the Spring/Summer 2011 collections, let’s whip out the PurseBlog Magic Eight-Ball-o-Fashionâ„¢ and predict what we’ll be seeing this week and wearing six months from now.

At times, fashion can be difficult. It can be temperamental, confusing and subversive in ways both good and bad, and when you get into the upper echelons of the style world, not all good clothes are pretty. In fact, that’s probably one of the biggest misconceptions about the fashion industry from those on the outside looking in – fashion is often not about being traditionally pretty.

Most people who follow fashion know the Chanel signatures very well: black, ivory, bouclé, suits, camellias, black, ivory. Rinse, repeat. Karl Lagerfeld’s Spring 2010 haute couture collection of graphic white and silver was a significant departure from the Chanel aesthetic that we have all come to expect, and his Chanel Fall/Winter 2010 Haute Couture collection is yet another giant step into new territory.

I hate to say it, but John Galliano’s haute couture collections for Christian Dior have been a bit repetitive over the past few seasons. The clothes have always been suitably beautiful and ornate, of course, but I left the last collection unsure if I had seen anything particularly interesting or memorable. Well. That certainly wasn’t a problem I had with Christian Dior Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2010.

In December of 2009 I was introduced to PaperFashion. It was love at first sight.
Katie Rodgers, the illustrator behind the site, fuses her love of fashion with her skilled artistic touch to create one-of-a-kind watercolor pieces. Her work is unlike anything I had seen before, and I was immediately drawn to it. After I saw her pieces, I also learned she does customize art.

I know I am not alone in complaining about my lack of closet space and desire for a much larger closet to organize my handbags and wardrobe. Every one of you reading this website may have felt this way at one point before (or still feel that way).

Tracy Hutson is one of the original style consultants on the show Extreme Makeover Home Edition.

For about three minutes in my life, I was under the impression that Carine Roitfeld, Editor-in-Chief of French Vogue, loved PurseBlog. That ended up being short-lived, for after Carine Roitfeld followed us on Twitter, she quickly unfollowed. Clearly it was a follow mishap. The mouse-clicked-on-the-wrong-button kind of follow.

You see, having a designer, editor, or important person follow you on Twitter means they take a liking to what you and your tweets have to offer (that is unless they follow anyone that follows them, which I never understand).

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