As much as I love a good basic bag, it’s the weird stuff that really gets my blood pumping. Transparency, nontraditional materials, crazy patterns, bold colors, embellishment of almost any kind – sign me up. Naturally, I love the Roy Lichtenstein-inspired 3.1 Phillip Lim Pop Art Bags. Split into two collections within the collection, Bang and The Breakup, the bags feature the bold colors and comic book-style graphics that are typical of Lichtenstein’s world-famous work.

In case you just can’t get enough of Infinitely Kusama, Louis Vuitton‘s capsule collection in collaboration with Japanese modern artist and polka dot enthusiast Yayoi Kusama, you’ll soon have even more ways to shop. Not only will customized windows roll out to Louis Vuitton boutiques across the globe, with the Kusama collection available in all of Vuitton’s 463 boutiques, but LV will also open up a handful of Kusama-only pop-up shops.

We took a small peek into the polka-dotted world of Yayoi Kusama for Louis Vuitton two weeks ago, but now we have some new details (and photos!) that we think you guys are going to want to see. The bags from the collection, which is officially entitled Infinitely Kusama, aren’t going to hit store shelves until October, but stock images of the line have hit the Internet, and we’ve got photos of all the bags for your viewing pleasure.

Louis Vuitton is famous for a lot of things at this point, and among them is the brand’s highly profitable relationship with the modern art community. Vuitton has collaborated with world-famous artists like Stephen Sprouse and Takashi Murakami on collections that have been nothing short of wildly successful, and in the process, that brand has spurred a full-on collaborative art trend among accessories brands as wide-ranging as Christian Dior and Coach.

Louis Vuitton may have pioneered the idea, but now handbags designers collaborating with high-profile artists is all the rage. Everyone from Dior to Coach has given it a shot, and in the case of Coach, it seems as though the company has judged such collaborations to be a roaring success. Fresh off of a much-loved menswear teamup with Hugo Guinness, the American handbag company has tapped New York artist James Nares to lend his prints to a collection of totes that will debut a week from today.

Louis Vuitton lovers have been in luck lately. Perhaps no other fashion brand in the world is more willing to throw open its archives and allow others to examine its DNA, whether it be a retrospective on historical travel pieces or a rumination on the contemporary work of Marc Jacobs. At Le Arts Decoratifs in Paris, both can now be seen simultaneously in the Louis Vuitton-Marc Jacobs exhibit, open to the public until September 16.

Many brands have tried out the designer-artists collaboration, but only Louis Vuitton has it down to a science (and an extremely profitable one at that). Even casual fashion watchers know the names of the artists that Vuitton has brought on – Stephen Sprouse, anyone? Takashi Murakami, does that ring a bell? Vuitton announced earlier this week that it’s about to make another artist a household fashion name – Yayoi Kusama, an 82-year-old Japanese visual artist known for her love of dots.

Images via WWD

Women’s Wear Daily has announced that Christian Dior will team up with Berlin contemporary art star Anselm Reyle for a line of accessories, handbags and makeup just in time for Miami’s Art Basel. I’m pretty sure that it cost me a hundred bucks just to write that sentence. In all seriousness, though, perhaps Reyle’s thoroughly modern take on these bags and small leather goods is an indication that LVMH is done being so precious with the Dior aesthetic?

Photos via Hermes

We’ve all heard the phrase “good enough to eat” used to describe a whole range of visually delectable non-edibles, but it looks as though Hermes has taken the words to heart in celebration of its new Hermes Kelly Picnic Bag; the brand put together homages to the icnonic Kelly bag made out of all the foods you’d need for a proper outdoor meal.

Have you ever noticed that there’s a certain subset of people who (incorrectly) think they’re very clever because they dislike the fashion industry, or they think they’ve got it all figured out? It seems like artist Shelter Serra, seller of the resin-casted Hermes Birkin pictured above, might be part of that group.

According to Refinery29, Serra calls the two-dimensional “art piece” a commentary on how an object that costs several months’ rent does little more than the function of a simple plastic bag, and he thinks we take such things for granted.

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