Alexander Wang Raphael Crossbody, $680 via Neiman Marcus

A couple of weeks ago, I found myself eating lunch in Soho with a friend while the Alexander Wang sample sale was in full swing. When we walked by and saw that there was no line, we could help but go in and poke around. I found a pair of amazing black brocade leggings from Resort 2011 that I can’t wait to wear once the weather is cold enough, but the thing that caught my eye the most was the Alexander Wang Raphael Crossbody Bag.

We all know Alexander Wang as The Boy King of Downtown Cool, which means that his clothes and accessories are often black, grey and sullen. And while some of us (read: me) like that look, it doesn’t really fit in with the idea of a resort collection or what most people want to wear when weather first starts to turn warm.

If you look at pictures of the Alexander Wang Fall 2011 show or read our recap of the accessories, you may have noticed something: There weren’t any handbags. Instead, Wang debuted his first collection of small leather goods on his fall catwalk. Starting this Friday at 6 a.m. New York time, that collection is going to be available to the public for one day only, exclusively through a very special partner – eBay.

We’d like to send our warmest PurseBlog congratulations out to Alexander Wang, who was named Accessory Designer of the Year at Monday night’s Council of Fashion Designers of America annual awards gala, which honors achievement in American design. We think that the CFDA made a great choice; few designers have captured the rapt attention of the accessories world in as convincing manner as Wang.

When I think of the Alexander Wang aesthetic up to this point, I always have a piece made of matte, slouchy black leather in mind. Not only has Wang made his accessories name with handbags that fit that description, but his clothing line can often be described with exactly the same words. For Alexander Wang’s Fall 2011 Handbags, though, the designer is mining the opposite end of the spectrum – the best designs from this collection are almost defiantly glossy and structured.

Alexander Wang Trudy Lambskin Tote, $875 via Bergdorf Goodman

Somehow, the two photos above are of the same bag, the Alexander Wang Trudy Lambskin Tote. They’re also from the same website, BergdorfGoodman.com. And yet, they’re completely different. One is an insightful peek at what a bag might look and feel like in person, and the other can best be described as an impediment to making those decisions.

We started the week with a discussion of an Alexander Wang bag that literally did not work at all, so it’s only fitting that we end the week with one of Wang’s bags the works on almost every level – the Alexander Wang Marion Mini Flap Bag. I got a chance to play with this bag during the same trip to Barneys as the ill-fated Jade clutch, and the results were much more satisfying.

Alexander Wang Jade Stingray and Suede Clutch, $795 via Net-a-Porter

If you’re a regular visitor to these parts, you might remember that back when I did my Alexander Wang Spring 2011 preview, I more or less drooled all over the Alexander Wang Jade Stingray and Suede Clutch. The stingray version of this design comes in both ivory with rose gold and black with matte black hardware, and I would have gleefully forked over the required cash for both options.

I’m always a big proponent of the daytime clutch, mostly because I think a lot of women assume that they’re really hard to carry when that’s often not the case. I wouldn’t necessarily take one to the grocery store or on another errand that I know will require me to carry lots of bags or packages, but for a lunch with girlfriends or something similar, a clutch can be a great way to set off an outfit.

Many of you have already heard about this, but I’m moving from Atlanta to New York City in May. Megs’ and Vlad’s move last fall inspired me, and since I’m young, single and wouldn’t have to change jobs (oh, the joys of working from home), it seemed like it would be a fantastic adventure. It still seems that way, but now that I’m getting down to the logistics of uprooting myself, I’m running into a few things about which I hadn’t really thought.

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